Featured Post

CubaLibre

Cuba Libre

In the weeks leading up to the vacation, my father, younger brother and I called it by a variety of jovial-sounding names. A Guy’s Getaway. The Majumdar Men take Cuba. I was 25 years old and living in the basement, feverishly working on what I hoped would be a sellable first novel while ducking calls [...]

Featured Posts

WinterRoad

The Palace of Justice

During the winter of 2005, I watched my father battle Quebec’s Public Curator office for control of my mother’s future. It was a low point for us all- the financial and emotional strain, coupled with the challenges of trying to somehow stay connected as a family at the tail end of over a decade of [...]

Featured Posts

dropfocus

The City Block That Encompassed A Childhood

She was an Indian-American growing up on a block in Bayside, Queens that resembled Sesame Street. Only instead of muppets, she had imaginary friends that kept her company while she played in the dark, cavernous basement of her family home. To the left of her house were the Ongs, who gifted her family a box [...]

Highly Discussed Posts

ElDave

When Dads Attack

People invariably comment on how charming my father is upon meeting him. This is true. The man is a dynamo with a booming voice and tendency to spin almost anything into a positive. You know the hesitation and last-minute rehearsing that goes on prior to introducing yourself to a stranger? He’s not like that. When [...]

AnishM.Teen

I Was Not Cool In High School

When I think, honestly, about my days as a high schooler, I experience an awful sinking feeling in the pit of my stomach. My God, the embarrassments. Now, I’m proud to say that I’ve made an ass of myself THROUGHOUT my 32 years on this planet. But being a six-foot-plus Bengali bookworm with zero coordination and [...]

groupshot

The 5 Rules of a Bengali Party

One of the strangest side-effects of growing up and leaving the world of my parents behind is that, after countless bar crawls and mornings feeling like the Cryptkeeper, I find myself missing the rigid frivolity of a Bengali party. There’s something masochistic about this. Few occasions are as deeply rooted in secret rules of engagement (and [...]

Zoomion

Guest Post: The Shifting Sands of Home

Perhaps it’s the natural instinct of an immigrant to want to make the new country his home.  Yet he continues to fail with every attempt because the birth country cannot truly be replaced. The definition of home becomes diffused, molded, and adjusted as time moves forward and the immigrant grows in his or her new [...]